"We younger Negro artists who create now intend to express our individual dark-skinned selves without fear or shame. If white people are pleased we are glad. If they are not, it doesn’t matter. We know we are beautiful. And ugly too. If colored people are pleased we are glad. If they are not, their displeasure doesn’t matter either. We build our temples for tomorrow, strong as we know how, and we stand on top of the mountain, free within ourselves."

Langston Hughes, The Negro Artist and the Racial Mountain (via millionen)

"While you motherfuckers waiting, I’ll be off the slave ship building pyramids, writing my own heiroglyphs."

(via itzjusme)

(via alien-passion)

@4 days ago with 1292 notes
chagalov:

René Char au Busclats, 1986 -by Serge Assier

Les mots qui vont surgir savent de nous des choses que nous ignorons d’eux.— René Char, in Chants de la Balandrane

photo from Serge Assier - Official Website

chagalov:

René Char au Busclats, 1986 -by Serge Assier

Les mots qui vont surgir savent de nous des choses que nous ignorons d’eux.
— René Char, in Chants de la Balandrane

photo from Serge Assier - Official Website

(via catherinewillis)

@1 week ago with 27 notes
dig-image:

Hans Gedda
Tomas Tranströmer
2006
Nationalmuseum, Swedish National Portrait Gallery
Erik Cornelius/Nationalmuseum
© Hans Gedda

dig-image:

Hans Gedda
Tomas Tranströmer
2006
Nationalmuseum, Swedish National Portrait Gallery
Erik Cornelius/Nationalmuseum
© Hans Gedda

@1 week ago with 6 notes

lustik:

Book Design | Zobeide by Italo Calvino - Samira Rahimi.

Lustik: twitter | pinterest | etsy

@3 weeks ago with 327 notes
kvetchlandia:

Henri cartier-Bresson     Playwright harold Pinter     1971

"The speech we hear is an indication of that which we don’t hear. It is a necessary avoidance, a violent, sly, and anguished or mocking smoke screen which keeps the other in its true place. When true silence falls we are left with echo but are nearer nakedness. One way of looking at speech is to say that it is a constant stratagem to cover nakedness." Harold Pinter, "Writing for the Theatre" 1962

kvetchlandia:

Henri cartier-Bresson     Playwright harold Pinter     1971

"The speech we hear is an indication of that which we don’t hear. It is a necessary avoidance, a violent, sly, and anguished or mocking smoke screen which keeps the other in its true place. When true silence falls we are left with echo but are nearer nakedness. One way of looking at speech is to say that it is a constant stratagem to cover nakedness." Harold Pinter, "Writing for the Theatre" 1962

@4 weeks ago with 10 notes
zolotoivek:

The poets Spiridon Drozhzhin and Rainer Maria Rilke, 1899-1900.

zolotoivek:

The poets Spiridon Drozhzhin and Rainer Maria Rilke, 1899-1900.

(via catherinewillis)

@1 week ago with 139 notes
radicalarchive:

'Literature on the American Working Class', Radical America / Bay Area Radical Education Project, United States, [1970].

radicalarchive:

'Literature on the American Working Class', Radical America / Bay Area Radical Education Project, United States, [1970].

@1 week ago with 14 notes

1109-83:

The Openings Press, initiated by Dom Sylvester Houedard and John Furnival in 1964, and based out of Gloucestershire, was a very small press dedicated to publishing concrete poetry. As well as self-published projects, the Press also published the work of Ian Hamilton Finlay, Tom Phillips, bpNichol, Stephen Hoare, Julien Blaine, Eugen Gomringer and several others.

The above prospectus provides a statement of intent:

"We aim to produce a series that is a complete integration of graphics and texts, ie. not an illustrated poem or a captioned drawing."

(text & images via artists’ books & multiples)

@3 weeks ago with 3 notes
nevver:

“The truth does not change according to our ability to stomach it.” 
—  Flannery O’Connor (above, with self-portrait)

nevver:

“The truth does not change according to our ability to stomach it.”
Flannery O’Connor (above, with self-portrait)

@4 weeks ago with 1741 notes

tenebrum:

☠☥Tu Tenebrarum☥☠

Thomas Ingoldsby ‘The Witches Frolic’ (with illustrations by Ernest M. Jessop) ‘The Ingoldsby Legends’ where written by the Clergyman Thomas Barham (1788-1845) under the pseudonym ‘Thomas Ingoldsby’, and originally published piecemeal in Bentleys Miscellany before being collected in book form in the early 1840s.

(via lonerwitch)

@1 month ago with 1783 notes